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The Pulse

Published
A health blog written by reporter Lynn Arditi





The Pulse
The Pulse
The Pulse
The Pulse

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We want your questions about our region to shape the stories we tell

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Working with local farms, a new app brings fresh produce to the customer's doorstep.

Sean Ellis, left, an exonerated prisoner, and instructor Chris Triparil

Fall River Mayor-elect Jasiel Correia stands in front of the city’s former police station.

Fall River Mayor Jaisel Correia is facing a recall election following his indictment on federal fraud charges. Residents this week decide whether to give him another shot.

The Massachusetts Alcohol and Substance Abuse Center in Plymouth houses men for court-mandated addiction treatment.

A group of men is suing the state of Massachusetts over the law, known as "Section 35," that allowed a judge to involuntarily commit each of them to addiction treatment.

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Gardiner discusses construction work in the visiting team's clubhouse with a contractor.

The Boston Red Sox play their home opener against the Toronto Blue Jays Tuesday afternoon at Fenway Park. Fans are hoping the return to home turf can help the struggling team get back on track. But the toughest job at Fenway might not belong to a player or coach. It’s arguably the job of Donnie Gardiner, the Fenway Facilities Superintendent who has to keep everything at the oldest Major League park running.

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Mattiello, who declined interview requests for this story, is shown here in 2018. He said in a statement that legislative workers from his Cranston district are hard-working people who do a good job for taxpayers.

The number of patronage jobs from House Speaker Nicholas Mattiello’s Cranston district has almost tripled during Mattiello’s time as speaker. Patronage jobs are one of the tools that a legislative leader like Mattiello can use to reinforce his own political power at the Statehouse.

Sen. Bernie Sanders stands outside his campaign bus in Carroll, Iowa, on Jan. 19, 2016. Sanders announced Tuesday that he's running for president in 2020.

The 2020 Democratic presidential primary will be similar to 2016 in at least one regard: Bernie Sanders is running for the nomination. But political observers say the electoral landscape has changed dramatically since Sanders’ last presidential bid, and not necessarily in ways that favor his latest candidacy.