Officers from the Fort Wayne Police Department block the entrance to the site of a former abortion clinic operated by Dr. Ulrich Klopfer on Thursday, Sept. 19, 2019, in Fort Wayne, Ind. After the doctor's death on Sept. 3, more than 2,000 medically preserved fetal remains were found in the garage of his home in rural Crete, Ill. (Eric Ginnard/The Herald-News via AP)

INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — The Latest on the discovery of fetal remains at the Illinois home of a former Indiana abortion doctor (all times local):

12:15 p.m.

Indiana's attorney general says thousands of patient medical records have been found at three shuttered Indiana abortion clinics that were operated by a late abortion doctor whose Illinois garage was found to contain more than 2,200 sets of preserved fetal remains.

Attorney General Curtis Hill said Friday that the women who were patients at Dr. Ulrich Klopfer's clinics in Gary, South Bend and Fort Wayne had an expectation that their privacy would be protected, but their records were "abandoned" in the clinics when they closed years ago.

Investigators searched the buildings and other properties Thursday, and Hill says no additional sets of fetal remains were found.

He says preliminary findings indicate that all 2,246 sets of fetal remains found last week in the garage at Klopfer's Will County, Illinois, home came from his former Indiana clinics.

__

11:20 a.m.

Indiana's attorney general will hold a news conference on his office's investigation into a late Indiana abortion doctor whose Illinois garage was found to contain more than 2,200 sets of preserved fetal remains.

Attorney General Curtis Hill on Friday will discuss the investigation into Dr. Ulrich Klopfer's former abortion clinics and other properties.

Klopfer, who died Sept. 3, had performed abortions at clinics in Fort Wayne, South Bend and Gary. Last week, his widow and her sister were cleaning out the garage at Klopfer's Will County, Illinois, home when they found the fetal remains.

Will County officials said Thursday the 2,246 sets of preserved fetal remains found in that garage are believed to have come from Klopfer's Indiana abortion clinics and will be turned over to Hill's office for its investigation.

Officers from the Fort Wayne Police Department search the building that once housed an abortion clinic owned by Dr. Ulrich Klopfer on Thursday, Sept. 19, 2019, in Fort Wayne, Ind. After the doctor's death on Sept. 3, more than 2,000 medically preserved fetal remains were found in the garage of his home in rural Crete, Ill. (Eric Ginnard/The Herald-News via AP)
A Will County Sheriff's patrol is stationed outside the home of deceased Dr. Ulrich Klopfer Thursday, Sept. 19, 2019, in Unincorporated Crete, Ill. Illinois authorities on Thursday, Sept. 19, 2019 said that more than 2,200 preserved fetal remains found stacked in the garage of a deceased doctor's home were from abortions performed in Indiana nearly two decades ago and it's up to authorities there to determine if crimes were committed.(AP Photo/Teresa Crawford)
St. Joseph County prosecutor Ken Cotter holds a press conference at the Women's Pavilion on Thursday, Sept. 19, 2019, in South Bend, Ind. Cotter said Thursday that authorities have found no fetal remains at a shuttered abortion clinic once operated by the late abortion Dr. Ulrich Klopfer whose Illinois property was found to contain more than 2,200 medically preserved fetal remains.  (Santiago Flores/South Bend Tribune via AP)