A gin tasting session is held at the Botlierskop Private Game Reserve, near Mossel Bay, South Africa, Monday, Oct. 23, 2019. After about five sizeable bags of dung are collected for a batch of 3,000 to 4,000 bottles of the gin, the droppings are dried and crumbled, then washed to remove dirt and sand. Eventually only the remains of the fruits, flowers, leaves and bark eaten by the elephants are left behind. (AP Photo/Denis Farrell)

MOSSEL BAY, South Africa (AP) — The makers of a South African gin infused with elephant dung swear their use of the animal's excrement is no gimmick.

The creators of Indlovu Gin, Les and Paula Ansley, stumbled across the idea a year ago after learning that elephants eat a variety of fruits and flowers and yet digest less than a third of it.

Tthey collect the dung themselves, using their bare hands.

The droppings are dried and crumbled, then washed to remove dirt and sand. Eventually only the remains of the fruits, flowers, leaves and bark eaten by the elephants are left behind.

Those botanicals are then sterilized and dried again. Eventually, the remains are infused in the gin, which they say gives the spirit a wooded, spicy, earthy taste.

Elsabe Hanekom takes part in a gin tasting session at the Botlierskop Private Game Reserve, near Mossel Bay, South Africa, Monday, Oct. 23, 2019. After about five sizeable bags of dung are collected for a batch of 3,000 to 4,000 bottles of the gin, the droppings are dried and crumbled, then washed to remove dirt and sand. Eventually only the remains of the fruits, flowers, leaves and bark eaten by the elephants are left behind. (AP Photo/Denis Farrell)
An elephant forages for food at Botlierskop Private Game Reserve, near Mossel Bay, South Africa, Tuesday, Oct. 24, 2019. The makers of a South African gin infused with elephant dung swear their use of the animal’s excrement is no gimmick. The creators of Indlovu Gin, Les and Paula Ansley, stumbled across the idea a year ago after learning that elephants eat a variety of fruits and flowers and yet digest less than a third of it. (AP Photo/Denis Farrell)
An elephant forages for food at Botlierskop Private Game Reserve, near Mossel Bay, South Africa, Tuesday, Oct. 24, 2019. The makers of a South African gin infused with elephant dung swear their use of the animal’s excrement is no gimmick. The creators of Indlovu Gin, Les and Paula Ansley, stumbled across the idea a year ago after learning that elephants eat a variety of fruits and flowers and yet digest less than a third of it. (AP Photo/Denis Farrell)
Les Ansley, and his wife Paula, collect fresh elephant dung in the Botlierskop Private Game Reserve, near Mossel Bay, South Africa, Tuesday, Oct. 24, 2019. The makers of a South African gin infused with elephant dung swear their use of the animal’s excrement is no gimmick. The creators of Indlovu Gin, Les and Paula Ansley, stumbled across the idea a year ago after learning that elephants eat a variety of fruits and flowers and yet digest less than a third of it. (AP Photo/Denis Farrell)
Les Ansley collects fresh elephant dung in the Botlierskop Private Game Reserve, near Mossel Bay, South Africa, Tuesday, Oct. 24, 2019. The makers of a South African gin infused with elephant dung swear their use of the animal’s excrement is no gimmick. The creators of Indlovu Gin, Les and Paula Ansley, stumbled across the idea a year ago after learning that elephants eat a variety of fruits and flowers and yet digest less than a third of it. (AP Photo/Denis Farrell)
Les Ansley collects fresh elephant dung in the Botlierskop Private Game Reserve, near Mossel Bay, South Africa, Tuesday, Oct. 24, 2019. The makers of a South African gin infused with elephant dung swear their use of the animal’s excrement is no gimmick. The creators of Indlovu Gin, Les and Paula Ansley, stumbled across the idea a year ago after learning that elephants eat a variety of fruits and flowers and yet digest less than a third of it. (AP Photo/Denis Farrell)
Husband and wife team Paula, left, and Les Ansley, right, collect fresh elephant dung in the Botlierskop Private Game Reserve, near Mossel Bay, South Africa, Tuesday, Oct. 24, 2019. The makers of a South African gin infused with elephant dung swear their use of the animal’s excrement is no gimmick. The creators of Indlovu Gin, Les and Paula Ansley, stumbled across the idea a year ago after learning that elephants eat a variety of fruits and flowers and yet digest less than a third of it. (AP Photo/Denis Farrell)
Les Ansley loads freshly collected elephant dung onto a vehicle in the Botlierskop Private Game Reserve, near Mossel Bay, South Africa, Tuesday, Oct. 24, 2019. The makers of a South African gin infused with elephant dung swear their use of the animal’s excrement is no gimmick. The creators of Indlovu Gin, Les and Paula Ansley, stumbled across the idea a year ago after learning that elephants eat a variety of fruits and flowers and yet digest less than a third of it. (AP Photo/Denis Farrell)
An elephant forages for food at Botlierskop Private Game Reserve, near Mossel Bay, South Africa, Tuesday, Oct. 24, 2019. The makers of a South African gin infused with elephant dung swear their use of the animal’s excrement is no gimmick. The creators of Indlovu Gin, Les and Paula Ansley, stumbled across the idea a year ago after learning that elephants eat a variety of fruits and flowers and yet digest less than a third of it. (AP Photo/Denis Farrell)
Gin maker, Les Ansley, conducts a gin tasting session at Botlierskop Private Game Reserve, near Mossel Bay, South Africa, Monday, Oct. 23, 2019. Ansley, with his wife, Paula, who are the makers of the South African gin infused with elephant dung, swear their use of the animal's excrement is not a gimmick but used after learning that elephants eat a variety of fruits and flowers and yet digest less that a third of it. (AP Photo/Denis Farrell)
A sample of elephant dung is shown at a gin tasting session at the Botlierskop Private Game Reserve, near Mossel Bay, South Africa, Monday, Oct. 23, 2019. After about five sizeable bags of dung are collected for a batch of 3,000 to 4,000 bottles of the gin, the droppings are dried and crumbled, then washed to remove dirt and sand. Eventually only the remains of the fruits, flowers, leaves and bark eaten by the elephants are left behind. (AP Photo/Denis Farrell)
A bottle of elephant dung infused Indlovu, which means elephant in the Zulu language, gin rests on bar at a tasting session at Botlierskop Private Game Reserve, near Mossel Bay, South Africa, Monday, Oct. 23, 2019. After about five sizeable bags of dung are collected for a batch of 3,000 to 4,000 bottles of the gin, the droppings are dried and crumbled, then washed to remove dirt and sand. Eventually only the remains of the fruits, flowers, leaves and bark eaten by the elephants are left behind. (AP Photo/Denis Farrell)