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Some Progress On Hospital Infections, But RI Still Lags On Some

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Rhode Island is making some progress against hospital-acquired infections. But some infection rates are still higher than the national average. Any time...

Rhode Island is making some progress against hospital-acquired infections. But some infection rates are still higher than the national average.

Any time a health care provider inserts a catheter, enters a vein, or performs surgery, for instance, there’s the potential for deadly bacteria to take hold. That’s why The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention tracks the rate of hospital-acquired infections. The most recent data from 2013 shows that, in Rhode Island, urinary tract infections associated with catheters are higher than the national baseline, but the rate hasn’t changed since the previous year. Antibiotic-resistant staphylococcus, or MRSA, infections have declined a bit.

Hospitals have put lots of protocols in place to reduce the chance of infection. But some could have higher rates because they treat more patients at risk, according to the Rhode Island Dept. of Health, which does some additional tracking of MRSA and other hospital safety measures.

Some Progress On Hospital Infections, But RI Still Lags On Some
Some Progress On Hospital Infections, But RI Still Lags On Some