Animated Loading
Having trouble loading this page? Get help troubleshooting.

RI Judiciary Edging Closer to an Updated Media Policy

Published
Three years after the Rhode Island Courts began working to update a 31-year-old media policy, the process is continuing. According to court spokesman...

Three years after the Rhode Island Courts began working to update a 31-year-old media policy, the process is continuing.

According to court spokesman Craig Berke, a second revision of guidelines "with a nod to today's technology" is under review by the state Supreme Court.

"There is no timetable for the next step," Berke said via email, although he said there will be discussion at some point involving judges, magistrates, court administrators and media representatives.

Back in 2012, Berke outlined plans by the Judiciary to update a media policy that has been in place since 1981. As we noted at the time, "[T]here’s a disconnect between how the Judiciary is on Twitter and how reporters were barred from barred from tweeting and using laptops during a nationally publicized Superior Court hearing on a union challenge to last year’s pension overhaul."

Flash forward to last week, and reporters had to leave Judge Sarah Taft-Carter's courtroom to tweet news of the proposed pension settlement between the state and a series of public-employee unions.

Meanwhile, Berke said in 2013 that regardless of how the media policy changes, individual judges will get to determine the operation of their own courtrooms.

RI Judiciary Edging Closer to an Updated Media Policy
RI Judiciary Edging Closer to an Updated Media Policy