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The Pulse: How Buddhists Approach Pain Without Painkillers

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Hospitals and doctors have made a concerted effort to control their patients’ pain over the past 10 years. That’s led, in part, to epidemic rates of...

Hospitals and doctors have made a concerted effort to control their patients’ pain over the past 10 years. That’s led, in part, to epidemic rates of painkiller and heroin addiction. On this week’s The Pulse, we hear from Buddhist teacher Kyle Davis about a different approach to pain and suffering.

A conversation about pain and suffering, and how Buddhists learn to see suffering as a door way into a new, maybe even a more liberating experience.

Davis is a teacher with Atisha Kadampa Buddhist Center, a Kadampa Buddhist organization with more than 1200 meditation centers around the world. Learn more about his practice at meditationinrhodeisland.org.

We talk  about how Buddhists think about pain and suffering, and the difference between the two. Davis shares some strategies for dealing with physical and mental pain. He says noticing and accepting the reality of your physical or mental pain is the first step, like opening a door into a new way of experiencing it.

The Pulse: How Buddhists Approach Pain Without Painkillers
The Pulse: How Buddhists Approach Pain Without Painkillers