FILE - In this June 17, 2014 file photo, a vehicle drives by a sign at Scott Gate, one of the entrances to Fort Sill, in Fort Sill, Okla. The federal government has chosen Fort Sill, a military base in Oklahoma, as the location for a new temporary shelter to house migrant children. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki, File)

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — A U.S. Army base in Oklahoma that the federal government selected as a temporary shelter for migrant children also held hundreds in a Japanese internment camp during World War II.

Historical data from the National Park Service and private organizations show Fort Sill was among at least 14 Army and Department of Justice facilities nationwide where Japanese Americans and Japanese immigrants were interred. The Army's War Relocation Authority held about 120,000 Japanese and Japanese Americans in "relocation centers" during the war with Japan.

The president of Densho, an organization that documents history of the camps, says sites like Fort Sill should be closed, not reused.

The Office of Refugee Resettlement plans to house up to 1,400 migrant children at Fort Sill, near Lawton, Oklahoma . The base also served as a temporary shelter for unaccompanied migrant children in 2014.

FILE - In this June 7, 2019 file photo, people cross the Rio Grande into the United States to turn themselves over to authorities and ask for asylum, as seen from Ciudad Juarez, Chihuahua, Mexico, opposite El Paso, Texas. The federal government will be opening a facility at an Army base in Oklahoma to house migrant children and is considering a customs port in southern New Mexico as another option as existing shelters are overwhelmed. The Office of Refugee Resettlement said Tuesday, June 11, 2019 it's dealing with a dramatic spike in the number of children crossing the border without parents. (AP Photo/Christian Torres, File)