Tess Harjo, left, embraces her grandmother, Sally Taylor, right, after being released from the Eddie Warrior Correctional Center Monday, Nov. 4, 2019 in Taft, Okla. More than 450 inmates walked out the doors of prisons across Oklahoma on Monday as part of what state officials say is the largest single-day mass commutation in U.S. history. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — More than 450 inmates walked out the doors of prisons across Oklahoma on Monday as part of what state officials say is the largest single-day mass commutation in U.S. history.

The release of inmates, all with convictions for low-level drug and property crimes, resulted from a bill signed by new Republican Gov. Kevin Stitt. The bill retroactively applied misdemeanor sentences for simple drug possession and low-level property crimes that state voters approved in 2016.

Stitt has made reducing Oklahoma's highest-in-the-nation incarceration rate one of his top priorities and has appointed reform-minded members to the state's Pardon and Parole Board.

Releasing the inmates will save Oklahoma an estimated $11.9 million over the cost of continuing to keep them behind bars, according to the governor's office.

The board last week considered 814 cases and recommended 527 inmates for commutation. However, 65 are being held on detainers, leaving about 462 inmates to be released on Monday.

"It feels amazing to be on the other side of the fence," said Tess Harjo, a 28-year-old who was released Monday from the Eddie Warrior Correctional Center in Taft, Oklahoma.

Harjo was sentenced to 15 years in prison after her Okmulgee County conviction last year for possession of methamphetamines. She said she was surprised at the number of women she met in prison serving long sentences for drug crimes.

"I have met many women in here who came from a medium- or maximum-security prison who have already served 18 or more years," Harjo said. "It's ridiculous."

Steve Bickley, the new executive director of the Pardon and Parole Board, said Monday's release is the most on a single day, surpassing President Barack Obama's 2017 commutation of the drug sentences of 330 federal prisoners on his last day in office.

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Tess Harjo walks out of the Eddie Warrior Correctional Center Monday, Nov. 4, 2019 in Taft, Okla. More than 450 inmates walked out the doors of prisons across Oklahoma on Monday as part of what state officials say is the largest single-day mass commutation in U.S. history. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)
Inmates being released from the Eddie Warrior Correctional Center walk through a line of inmates that are a part of the Regimented Treatment Program at the prison, Monday, Nov. 4, 2019 in Taft, Okla. More than 450 inmates walked out the doors of prisons across Oklahoma on Monday as part of what state officials say is the largest single-day mass commutation in U.S. history. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)
Sally Taylor, left, embraces her granddaughter Tess Harjo, right, after Harjo was released from the Eddie Warrior Correctional Center, Monday, Nov. 4, 2019, in Taft, Okla. More than 450 inmates walked out the doors of prisons across Oklahoma on Monday as part of what state officials say is the largest single-day mass commutation in U.S. history. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)
Danni Roberts is given a high five from Correctional officer Sgt. Pamela Carlis as she leaves Dr. Eddie Warrior Correctional Center after hundreds of inmates had their sentences commuted by the state Monday, Nov. 4, 2019.  (Mike Simons/Tulsa World via AP)
Oklahoma first lady Sarah Stitt speaks following the release of female inmates from Eddie Warrior Correctional Center Monday, Nov. 4, 2019 in Taft, Okla. More than 450 inmates walked out the doors of prisons across Oklahoma on Monday as part of what state officials say is the largest single-day mass commutation in U.S. history. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)
Recently released inmate Donnie Crow, left, holds her 17-month-old son Fayedon Davis as she walks from the Eddie Warrior Correctional Center with Christopher Davis Sr. and son 32-month old Christopher Davis II, following her release Monday, Nov. 4, 2019 in Taft, Okla. More than 450 inmates walked out the doors of prisons across Oklahoma on Monday as part of what state officials say is the largest single-day mass commutation in U.S. history. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)
Inmates being released from the Eddie Warrior Correctional Center walk through a line of inmates that are a part of the Regimented Treatment Program at the prison, Monday, Nov. 4, 2019 in Taft, Okla. More than 450 inmates walked out the doors of prisons across Oklahoma on Monday as part of what state officials say is the largest single-day mass commutation in U.S. history. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)
Oklahoma Gov. Kevin Stitt speaks following the release of 70 inmates from the Eddie Warrior Correctional Center Monday, Nov. 4, 2019 in Taft, Okla. More than 450 inmates walked out the doors of prisons across Oklahoma on Monday as part of what state officials say is the largest single-day mass commutation in U.S. history. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)
Lori Scott kisses her grandson Jasper Artigue, 3 mos., after being released from Dr. Eddie Warrior Correctional Center after having her sentence commuted by the state Monday, Nov. 4, 2019. It was the first time Scott held her grandson. (Mike Simons/Tulsa World via AP)
Recently released inmate Donnie Crow, right, holds her 17-month-old son Fayedon Davis as she celebrates with Christopher Davis Sr. and son 32-month old Christopher Davis II following her release Monday, Nov. 4, 2019 in Taft, Okla. More than 450 inmates walked out the doors of prisons across Oklahoma on Monday as part of what state officials say is the largest single-day mass commutation in U.S. history. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)
Lori Scott kisses her grandson Jasper Artigue, 3 mos., after being released from Dr. Eddie Warrior Correctional Center after having her sentence commuted by the state Monday, Nov. 4, 2019. It was the first time Scott held her grandson. (Mike Simons/Tulsa World via AP)
Inmates being released from the Eddie Warrior Correctional Center walk through the gate at the prison, Monday, Nov. 4, 2019 in Taft, Okla. More than 450 inmates walked out the doors of prisons across Oklahoma on Monday as part of what state officials say is the largest single-day mass commutation in U.S. history. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)
Sally Taylor, left, and Sarah Taylor, right, wait for their granddaughter and niece, Tess Harjo, to walk out of Eddie Warrior Correctional Center Monday, Nov. 4, 2019 in Taft, Okla. More than 450 inmates walked out the doors of prisons across Oklahoma on Monday as part of what state officials say is the largest single-day mass commutation in U.S. history. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)
Tess Harjo, right, embraces her aunt Sarah Taylor, left, after being released from Eddie Warrior Correctional Center Monday, Nov. 4, 2019 in Taft, Okla. More than 450 inmates walked out the doors of prisons across Oklahoma on Monday as part of what state officials say is the largest single-day mass commutation in U.S. history. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)