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Monarch Migration Drives Insects To Rhode Island Coast

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Monarch butterflies have made their way into Rhode Island, as they migrate south. These orange and black insects have migrated to the coast to gather...

Monarch butterflies have made their way into Rhode Island, as they migrate south. These orange and black insects have migrated to the coast to gather food in the form of nectar.

David Gregg, of the Rhode Island Natural History Survey, says look for Monarchs on warm and sunny days in places like Westerly and Newport.

"Butterflies are active during the day, when it’s warm and sunny, because that’s when flowers produce the most nectar,” said Gregg. “That’s what makes butterflies go. So any flowery place along the coast.” 

Gregg said the butterflies will use that nectar to fuel their long trip to Florida and the Gulf Coast.

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A female Monarch Butterfly
A female Monarch Butterfly