Animated Loading
Having trouble loading this page?
Get help troubleshooting.

Kooiker-huh? An intro to Westminster dog show's new breeds

Published
FILE - In this Jan. 10, 2018 file photo, Escher, left, and Rhett, center, Nederlandse kooikerhondje, and Juno, right, a grand basset griffon Vendeen, are shown by their handlers during a news conference at the American Kennel Club headquarters in New York. The two breeds are eligible to compete in the Westminster Kennel Club dog show for the first time in 2019. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer, File)

NEW YORK (AP) — There are two new breeds — and 16 syllables — coming to the Westminster Kennel Club dog show this year.

The grand basset griffon Vendeen (grahnd bah-SAY' grih-FAHN' vahn-DAY'-ahn) and the Nederlandse kooikerhondje (NAY'-dehr-lahn-seh KOY'-kehr-hahnd-jeh) make their debuts at next month's show.

One dog from each breed will get a nationally televised turn among the more than 190 breeds on the purple carpet at the nation's premier canine contest.

About 3,200 dogs are entered to compete. They range from wee Malteses to strapping mastiffs.

The show includes agility and obedience competitions along with the breed judging that leads to the signature Best in Show trophy, awarded on Feb. 12 at Madison Square Garden and live on FS1.

The relatively new agility and obedience contests are open to mixed-breed dogs as well as purebreds.

FILE - In this Jan. 10, 2018 file photo, Nederlandse kooikerhondje Escher, left, and Rhett are shown during a news conference at the American Kennel Club headquarters in New York. The Nederlandse kooikerhondje, originally a Dutch duck-hunting dog, is one of two breeds eligible to compete in the Westminster dog show for the first time in 2019. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer, File)
FILE - In this Jan. 10, 2018 file photo, Juno, a grand basset griffon Vendeen, is shown during a news conference at the American Kennel Club headquarters in New York. The grand basset griffon Vendeen, developed in France to hunt rabbit and hare, is one of two breeds eligible to compete in the Westminster Kennel Club dog show for the first time in 2019. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer, File)
FILE - In this Jan. 10, 2018 file photo, Escher, left, and Rhett, center, Nederlandse kooikerhondje, and Juno, right, a grand basset griffon Vendeen, are shown by their handlers during a news conference at the American Kennel Club headquarters in New York. The two breeds are eligible to compete in the Westminster Kennel Club dog show for the first time in 2019. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer, File)
FILE - In this Jan. 10, 2018 file photo, Escher, left, and Rhett, center, Nederlandse kooikerhondje, and Juno, right, a grand basset griffon Vendeen, are shown by their handlers during a news conference at the American Kennel Club headquarters in New York. The two breeds are eligible to compete in the Westminster Kennel Club dog show for the first time in 2019. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer, File)
FILE - In this Jan. 10, 2018 file photo, Nederlandse kooikerhondje Escher, left, and Rhett are shown during a news conference at the American Kennel Club headquarters in New York. The Nederlandse kooikerhondje, originally a Dutch duck-hunting dog, is one of two breeds eligible to compete in the Westminster dog show for the first time in 2019. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer, File)
FILE - In this Jan. 10, 2018 file photo, Nederlandse kooikerhondje Escher, left, and Rhett are shown during a news conference at the American Kennel Club headquarters in New York. The Nederlandse kooikerhondje, originally a Dutch duck-hunting dog, is one of two breeds eligible to compete in the Westminster dog show for the first time in 2019. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer, File)
FILE - In this Jan. 10, 2018 file photo, Juno, a grand basset griffon Vendeen, is shown during a news conference at the American Kennel Club headquarters in New York. The grand basset griffon Vendeen, developed in France to hunt rabbit and hare, is one of two breeds eligible to compete in the Westminster Kennel Club dog show for the first time in 2019. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer, File)
FILE - In this Jan. 10, 2018 file photo, Juno, a grand basset griffon Vendeen, is shown during a news conference at the American Kennel Club headquarters in New York. The grand basset griffon Vendeen, developed in France to hunt rabbit and hare, is one of two breeds eligible to compete in the Westminster Kennel Club dog show for the first time in 2019. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer, File)