Carmen Thompson, of El Reno, Okla., looks over a poster of her niece, Emily Morgan, who was murdered in 2016, before the start of a march to call for justice for missing and murdered indigenous women Friday, June 14, 2019, at the Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribes of Oklahoma in Concho, Okla. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)

CONCHO, Okla. (AP) — Families and friends of missing or slain American Indian women and girls are again calling for justice for their loved ones.

About 200 people gathered Friday near the headquarters of the Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribes in Concho, Oklahoma. Many wore red and marched, holding signs with pictures of women on them.

Similar demonstrations have taken place in other states amid growing concern that police nationwide are not adequately identifying or reporting cases of missing and murdered Native American and Alaska Native women and girls. Those demographic groups have some of the nation's highest rates of sexual and domestic violence .

Kateri Fletcher is a Cheyenne and Arapaho tribal government official who helped organize the event. She said it was designed to bring awareness and show support for families who still need answers.

People march to call for justice for missing and murdered indigenous women Friday, June 14, 2019, at the Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribes of Oklahoma in Concho, Okla. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)
Miranda Muehl, of Mustang, Okla., marches during a march to call for justice for missing and murdered indigenous women Friday, June 14, 2019, at the Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribes of Oklahoma in Concho, Okla. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)
People march to call for justice for missing and murdered indigenous women Friday, June 14, 2019, at the Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribes of Oklahoma in Concho, Okla. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)
Jonathan Sam of Stillwater, Okla., a Navajo and Zuni native, joins a march to call for justice for missing and murdered indigenous women Friday, June 14, 2019, at the Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribes of Oklahoma in Concho, Okla. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)
A woman reaches for a red dress sticker, a symbol of missing and murdered indigenous women, following a march to call for justice for missing and murdered indigenous women Friday, June 14, 2019, at the Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribes of Oklahoma in Concho, Okla. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)
Keith Hamilton, of El Reno, Okla., walks past a row of signs in memory of missing and murdered indigenous women following a march to call for justice for missing and murdered indigenous women Friday, June 14, 2019, at the Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribes of Oklahoma in Concho, Okla. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)
A photographer videos signs in memory of missing and murdered indigenous women following a march to call for justice for missing and murdered indigenous women Friday, June 14, 2019, at the Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribes of Oklahoma in Concho, Okla. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)