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Ethics Commission Says Revolving Door Law Doesn't Apply In Williamson Case

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The state Ethics Commission on Tuesday found that Rhode Island’s revolving door law does not apply to former state Rep. Tim Williamson, a part-time lawy...

The state Ethics Commission on Tuesday found that Rhode Island’s revolving door law does not apply to former state Rep. Tim Williamson, a part-time lawyer for the House Judiciary Committee, and his candidacy for a vacant District Court judicial post.

Commission spokesman Jason Gramitt says Williamson’s House Judiciary Committee job is not among the government roles covered by the revolving door law.

“That particular revolving door law only applies to the most senior inner circle people who serve on the staff of an elected official; think chief of staff, chief legal counsel, directors of policy or communications, et cetera," Gramitt said. "Staffers who are a few links down the chain of command, like Mr. Williamson, are not restricted by the revolving door."

Williamson had asked the Ethics Commission last month whether any ethics regulations preclude him from seeking or accepting a judicial position. The Ethics Commission, on a unanimous vote, decided the answer was "no."

You can read the commission's written decision here.

Williamson is among five people on a short list of candidates for a vacant post as a district court judge.

Ethics Commission Says Revolving Door Law Doesn't Apply In Williamson Case
Ethics Commission Says Revolving Door Law Doesn't Apply In Williamson Case