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Environmentalists Gather For Annual Meeting

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Wildlife, climate change and safe drinking water are on the agenda this weekend at the state’s largest annual environmental summit. Meg Kerr, the...

Wildlife, climate change and safe drinking water are on the agenda this weekend at the state’s largest annual environmental summit.

Meg Kerr, the director of policy at the Audubon Society of Rhode Island, is one of the organizers of the Land and Water Conservation Summit. The summit is expected to draw more than 300 people representing land trusts, watershed organizations and conservation commissions.

“When we first started the summit the cross pollination between those groups was limited," said Kerr. "And we’ve really increased the conversations among grassroots organizations and sharing [ideas] amongst them.”

Kerr said the daylong conference is an opportunity to exchange ideas about how to protect the state’s most vulnerable resources.

“Probably the biggest land and water issue that Rhode Island faces is the issue of climate change and what’s it’s doing to impact our water supplies, and changing habitats and impact on birds,” she said.

The summit will feature guest speakers and workshops that address these challenges. Rhode Island Public Radio’s Environmental Reporter Ambar Espinoza will lead a conversation about the Great Salt Pond, where archeologists have discovered the remains of a former Narragansett tribal village.   

Members of several grassroots environmental organizations have set up tables to network and share information at this weekend's Land & Water Conservation Summit at the University of Rhode Island.
Members of several grassroots environmental organizations have set up tables to network and share information at this weekend's Land & Water Conservation Summit at the University of Rhode Island.