Cars drive past billboards of Portuguese Prime Minister and Socialist Party leader Antonio Costa, left, and Left Bloc leader Catarina Martins, in Lisbon, Thursday, Oct. 3, 2019. Portugal will hold a general election on Oct. 6 in which voters will choose members of the next Portuguese parliament. Slogan on the Socialist's billboard reads in Portuguese,

LISBON, Portugal (AP) — Portugal's general election this weekend makes the country look like Europe's odd man out.

While, across the European Union, radical new parties are reshaping the political landscape and Socialist parties have lost ground in recent years, in Portugal political tradition is still what it used to be.

The two mainstream parties are expected to garner most votes in Sunday’s ballot, with the center-left Socialist Party showing an opinion poll lead of at least 7 percentage points over the center-right Social Democratic Party.

And there is a broad consensus in Portugal that migrants are indispensable _ to fill unskilled jobs and help offset a demographic time bomb as a low birth rate depletes the national population. That has denied oxygen to nationalist parties, which have remained tiny and on the political fringe.

In this Sept. 23, 2019 file picture, Portuguese Prime Minister and Socialist Party leader Antonio Costa shakes hands with Social Democratic Party leader Rui Rio, left, before an election debate on national radio in Lisbon. The two mainstream parties are expected to garner most votes in upcoming Sunday's General Election ballot, with the center-left Socialist Party showing an opinion poll lead of at least 7 percentage points over the center-right Social Democratic Party. (AP Photo/Armando Franca)
In this Sept. 24, 2019 file picture, Portuguese Prime Minister and Socialist Party leader Antonio Costa raises his fist during a campaign rally in Lisbon. The two mainstream parties are expected to garner most votes in Sunday's national General Election ballot, with the center-left Socialist Party showing an opinion poll lead of at least 7 percentage points over the center-right Social Democratic Party. (AP Photo/Armando Franca)
In this picture taken Oct. 2, Serenah Sabat, a 26-year-old Palestinian asylum-seeker from Bethlehem, poses for a photo at the restaurant she co-manages in Lisbon.  As Portugal heads to the polls for a general election the coming weekend, the liberal and migrant-welcoming Socialist Party is tipped for a resounding win, without the loud populists far-right groups that have played hard in some other parts of Europe. (AP Photo/Armando Franca)
In this picture taken Oct. 2, Serenah Sabat, a 26-year-old Palestinian asylum-seeker from Bethlehem, center, laughs with Fatima Ghannam, right, and Rana, both from Syria, at the Middle Eastern restaurant where they work in Lisbon. Portugal heads to the polls for a general election the coming weekend, with the liberal and migrant-welcoming Socialist Party is tipped for a resounding win, without the loud populists far-right groups that have played hard in some other parts of Europe. (AP Photo/Armando Franca)
A young woman walks by an election billboard of Portuguese Prime Minister and Socialist Party leader Antonio Costa with the slogan