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Education Leaders Tout Statewide High School Graduation Increase

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Rhode Island’s four-year high school graduation rate has improved since last year. The 2015 graduation rate was 83 percent, up six points from 2014. Nor...

Rhode Island’s four-year high school graduation rate has improved since last year. The 2015 graduation rate was 83 percent, up six points from 2014.

North Providence High School had the highest four-year graduation rate in the state, at 98 percent. The marching band played, and cheerleaders cheered as public officials spoke in the school auditorium.

State education commissioner Ken Wagner joined the celebration, but cautioned that graduating from high school and being prepared for college are two different things.

“Too many of our students, still go into college and have to be placed into remediation classes, and have to pay for things they should have learned in high school,” said Wagner.

Governor Gina Raimondo touted the gains, which cut across a variety of socio-economic and cultural levels.

“We’ve improved in every category, low income students, students of color, Latino students, boys and girls, all moving in the right direction,” said Raimondo.

Raimondo said the state still must work to increase the graduation rates overall. The schools with the lowest graduation rates were located in the state’s core cities including Providence and Woonsocket.

The rate does not measure students who took longer than four years to graduate. The statewide dropout rate among the class of 2015 was about 6.5 percent.

Students from the class of 2016 at a press event in the North Providence High School auditorium. North Providence had a 98 percent graduation rate in 2015.
Students from the class of 2016 at a press event in the North Providence High School auditorium. North Providence had a 98 percent graduation rate in 2015.