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Dangerous Rip Currents At Area Beaches Left Over From Stormy Weekend

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The National Weather Service has issued a warning about dangerously strong rip-currents, also known as undertows. The hazardous surf is a leftover from...

The National Weather Service has issued a warning about dangerously strong rip-currents, also known as undertows. The hazardous surf is a leftover from the weekend’s stormy weather.

The storms on land may have quieted, but the water offshore is still dangerous, according to the National Weather Service. Rough surf has caused stronger-than average rip-currents.

Weather Service meteorologist Kimberly Buttrick said it typically takes one to two days for the coastal waters to calm after heavy rains.

“Now we do have a southwest wind blowing on shore, the south coast of Rhode Island, so that can, kind of, have them linger longer than otherwise,” said Buttrick.

If you are caught in a rip current, the National Weather Service recommends swimming parallel to the beach to get out of the fast-moving column of water.

Buttrick added, if the rip currents don’t deter you from getting into the water, cooler-than usual temps may; area beaches have reported temperatures in the low 60s.

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Dangerous Rip Currents At Area Beaches Left Over From Stormy Weekend
Dangerous Rip Currents At Area Beaches Left Over From Stormy Weekend