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Cranston City Council May Ask For Change To Police Disciplinary Process

Published
The Cranston City Council may ask the General Assembly to overhaul the disciplinary process used for vetting complaints against police officers. Yet...

The Cranston City Council may ask the General Assembly to overhaul the disciplinary process used for vetting complaints against police officers. Yet those changes are considered unlikely due to opposition from police unions.

Rhode Island is one of a number of states with a so-called Law Enforcement Officers’ Bill of Rights. Supporters say the measure protects police against unsubstantiated allegations. Yet critics say the Officers’ Bill of Rights blocks transparency and accountability.

Regardless, Rhode Island League of Cities and Towns head Daniel Beardsley said the General Assembly is unlikely to make changes.

“I can tell you that the both the International Brotherhood of Police Officers and the Fraternal Order of Police will undoubtedly resist quite aggressively any changes to the Law Enforcement Officers’ Bill of Rights,” said Beardsly.

Some Cranston councilors say the Bill of Rights has limited transparency in the case of the officer identified as the architect of a 2013 parking ticket blitz in the city.

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Cranston City Hall
Cranston City Hall