In this photo released by the official website of the office of the Iranian Presidency, President Hassan Rouhani speaks at a public gathering in the city of Rafsanjan in Iran's southwest Kerman province, Monday, Nov. 11, 2019. Rouhani on Monday called on hard-liners to support the country's troubled nuclear deal, saying it could open up international arms sales for the Islamic Republic next year. (Office of the Iranian Presidency via AP)

VIENNA (AP) — The U.N. atomic watchdog says Iran's stockpiles of low-enriched uranium are still growing in violation of the 2015 nuclear deal.

In a confidential quarterly report distributed to member states, the International Atomic Energy Agency said Iran's stockpile of low-enriched uranium still exceeds the amount allowed by the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action, or JCPOA. The report was seen Monday by The Associated Press.

It also said Iran continues to enrich uranium up to 4.5%, above the 3.67% allowed.

The agency says as of Nov. 3, Iran's stockpile of low-enriched uranium was 372.3 kilograms (820.78 pounds) compared to 241.6 kilograms reported on Aug. 19, and past the 202.8 kilogram limit.

Since the U.S. pulled out of the Iran nuclear pact last year and imposed sanctions, Iran has been slowly violating its provisions to pressure other nations to provide more incentives. 

In this photo released by the official website of the office of the Iranian Presidency, President Hassan Rouhani speaks at a public gathering in the city of Rafsanjan in Iran's southwest Kerman province, Monday, Nov. 11, 2019. Rouhani on Monday called on hard-liners to support the country's troubled nuclear deal, saying it could open up international arms sales for the Islamic Republic next year. (Office of the Iranian Presidency via AP)
Italian Foreign Minister Luigi Di Maio, right, greets his Luxembourg counterpart Jean Asselborn an European Foreign Affairs Ministers meeting at the Europa building in Brussels, Monday, Nov. 11, 2019. European Union foreign ministers on Monday debated ways to keep the Iran nuclear deal intact after the Islamic Republic began enrichment work at its Fordo site in a fresh act of defiance that seems likely to spell the end of the painstakingly drafted international agreement. (AP Photo/Francisco Seco)
Polish Foreign Minister Jacek Czaputowicz, second right, talks to Lithuanian Foreign Minister Linas Linkevicius, left, Malta's Foreign Minister Carmelo Abela, second left, and Croatian Foreign Minister Gordan Grlic Radman during an European Foreign Affairs Ministers meeting at the Europa building in Brussels, Monday, Nov. 11, 2019. European Union foreign ministers are discussing ways to keep the Iran nuclear deal intact after the Islamic Republic began enrichment work at its Fordo enrichment facility. (AP Photo/Francisco Seco)
Head of the Atomic Energy Organization of Iran Ali Akbar Salehi applauds at the Mustafa scientific award ceremony, in Tehran, Iran, Monday, Nov. 11, 2019. Salehi told The Associated Press that Iran is now producing more low-enriched uranium daily after restarting an underground lab. Salehi made the comments on Monday as Iranian President Hassan Rouhani also called on hard-liners to support the country's troubled nuclear deal as it could open up international arms sales for the Islamic Republic next year. (AP Photo/Vahid Salemi)
Italian Foreign Minister Luigi Di Maio arrives to an European Foreign Affairs Ministers meeting at the Europa building in Brussels, Monday, Nov. 11, 2019. European Union foreign ministers on Monday debated ways to keep the Iran nuclear deal intact after the Islamic Republic began enrichment work at its Fordo site in a fresh act of defiance that seems likely to spell the end of the painstakingly drafted international agreement. (AP Photo/Francisco Seco)