In this March 26, 2019 photo, Bonnie Loedel hugs her cousin while her brother Daniel Loedel holds a wooden urn containing the skeletal remains of their sister Isabel, as they arrive to the Remembrance, Truth and Justice Mausoleum for the Victims of State Sponsored Terrorism, at the public cemetery in La Plata, Argentina. Isabel Loedel, whose remains were only identified last year, was forcibly disappeared during the country's 1976-1983 dictatorship. (AP Photo/Tomas F. Cuesta)

BUENOS AIRES, Argentina (AP) — Bonnie and Daniel Loedel walked into a mausoleum with an urn holding the bone remains of their sister Isabel, who had been unidentified for four decades after being forcibly disappeared during Argentina's military dictatorship.

Delivering the simple wooden box was the last step of an arduous identification process that they hope will bring the family closure and, at the same time, thwart the goal of the military regime that rights groups estimate killed or disappeared 30,000 people while seeking to make its victims invisible.

The Remembrance, Truth and Justice Mausoleum for the Victims of State Sponsored Terrorism is at a cemetery in La Plata, a town about 35 miles from Argentina's capital of Buenos Aires. It holds the remains of at least a dozen people who disappeared during the dictatorship.

This March 26, 2019 photo shows a wooden urn that contains the skeletal remains of Isabel Loedel, who was forcibly disappeared during the country's dictatorship, adorned with a 1976 image of her and her partner Julio Di Giacinti, in the Remembrance, Truth and Justice Mausoleum for the Victims of State Sponsored Terrorism, at the public cemetery in La Plata, Argentina. She has now rejoined her partner, Julio Di Giacinti, who was identified by the forensic team seven years ago. Both were killed in early 1978 by dictatorship agents. (AP Photo/Tomas F. Cuesta)
In this March 26, 2019 photo, Daniel Loedel and his sister Bonnie, give thanks to family and friends for attending the burial service of their sister Isabel in the Remembrance, Truth and Justice Mausoleum for the Victims of State Sponsored Terrorism, at the public cemetery in La Plata, Argentina. The mausoleum holds the remains of at least a dozen people who were forcibly disappeared during the 1976-1983 military junta. (AP Photo/Tomas F. Cuesta)
In this March 26, 2019 photo, Daniel Di Giacinti speaks at the burial service for his sister-in-law Isabel Loedel, in the Remembrance, Truth and Justice Mausoleum for the Victims of State Sponsored Terrorism, at the public cemetery in La Plata, Argentina. Di Giacinti provided a genetic sample to identify his missing brother, Isabel's partner, Julio Di Giacinti.
In this March 26, 2019 photo, Bonnie Loedel holds a 1977 image that shows her older sister Isabel Loedel with her partner Julio Di Giacinti and his godmother Porota Rebuffo, during Isabel's burial service in the Remembrance, Truth and Justice Mausoleum for the Victims of State Sponsored Terrorism, at the public cemetery in La Plata, Argentina. Isabel has now rejoined her partner whose remains were identified by the Argentine Forensic Anthropology Team seven years ago. Both were killed in early 1978 by dictatorship agents. (AP Photo/Tomas F. Cuesta)
This March 28, 2019 photo shows the skeletal remains of an unidentified missing person in the laboratory of the Argentine Anthropology Forensic Team in Buenos Aires, Argentina. The team, an independent group of scientists who developed their expertise identifying victims of the 1976-1983 military junta , has been working since 1984, a year after Argentina's return to democracy. (AP Photo/Tomas F. Cuesta)
In this March 28, 2019 photo, Gala Maruscak, of the Argentine Anthropology Forensic Team, examines the skull of an unidentified missing person, in her laboratory in Buenos Aires, Argentina. The identification process gives a name to the invisible. (AP Photo/Tomas F. Cuesta)
This March 28, 2019 photo shows the skeletal remains of unidentified missing persons laid out on tables in the laboratory of the Argentine Anthropology Forensic Team, in Buenos Aires, Argentina. The team works in the former Naval Mechanics School, which was a notorious clandestine detention and torture center that held an estimated 5,000 prisoners and is now a museum for remembrance. (AP Photo/Tomas F. Cuesta)
This March 28, 2019 photo shows the skeletal remains of an unidentified missing person in the laboratory of the Argentine Anthropology Forensic Team, in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Because genetic profiles of the approximately 600 remains that are unidentified don't match any of the samples in the team's database, the non-governmental group has launched a campaign urging more relatives of the disappeared to provide blood samples to help identify the remaining bodies and allow them proper burials. (AP Photo/Tomas F. Cuesta)
In this March 28, 2019 photo, Gala Maruscak, a member of the Argentine Anthropology Forensic Team, examines the skeletal remains of an unidentified missing person in her laboratory, in Buenos Aires, Argentina. The team has recovered the bodies of more than 1,400 disappeared people and identified 795 of them. (AP Photo/Tomas F. Cuesta)
In this March 28, 2019 photo, Mariana Selva, Argentine Anthropology Forensic Team lab coordinator, returns a box filled with the skeletal remains of an unidentified missing person, to a storage unit at the Museum of Remembrance in Buenos Aires, Argentina. The team works in the former Naval Mechanics School, which was a notorious clandestine detention and torture center that held an estimated 5,000 prisoners. (AP Photo/Tomas F. Cuesta)